Methods of shipbuilding

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Methods of shipbuilding


The shipbuilding of the ancient Greeks (and of other ancient civilisation) began with the building (at both sides of the powerful joist of the keel) the adjacent boards of the shell and finished with the placement of traverse "possessors" of the skeleton (which was used mainly for the support of the above supplementary structures). This process is named "first the shell" and is opposite to the modern way of shipbuilding "first the skeleton" that has been applied since the 7th century A.D. The fitting of boards of the ship shell was achieved with two methods. In the "sewn" ships this was accomplished with the opening up of holes along the boards and their sewing with powerful ropes. In the ships "with pegs" this was accomplished with the opening of mortises at the side of the boards, the adaptation of the pegs (tenons) in them and made secure with pins. Occasionally, in difficult points the two methods were applied simultaneously.